The Magic In The Receiver – A Kefalonia Novel

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Kefalonia’s Magnificent Scenic Drive

Kefalonia’s Magnificent Scenic Drive

By on Nov 2, 2012 in Blog | 1 comment

Visitors to the island of Kefalonia have plenty to choose from when it comes to beaches and sightseeing. My favorite trip is the magnificent drive from Argostoli to the harbor village of Fiskardo. It’s one of the most scenic routes in the Greek islands and should be on everyone’s to-do list. Read the entire post on the official website of the Greek National Tourism Organisation   Paul Dillon is a British author living in Los Angeles, California. His first novel, THE MAGIC IN THE RECEIVER, was published in July 2012....

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Remembering the 1953 Kefalonia Earthquake Disaster

Remembering the 1953 Kefalonia Earthquake Disaster

By on Aug 12, 2012 in Blog | 2 comments

August 12, 2012 Today marks the 59th anniversary of the Great Ionian Earthquake. The 1953 disaster killed hundreds of people on the island of Kefalonia, destroying most of its buildings. Thousands were made homeless and forced to evacuate. The neighboring islands of Zante (Zakynthos) and Ithaca suffered similar fates. Even though I have no family connections, the time spent investigating the event brought the tragedy close to my heart. For those not familiar, over a hundred tremors were reported in mid-August of that year, culminating in a 7.6 magnitude earthquake that lifted the island sixty centimeters. In my fictional version, I concentrate on the days of August 9, 11, and 12. During my research, I contacted Eleni Villianou, who runs a Kefalonia history and genealogy website. She kindly provided advice on Greek customs and social conditions on the island in the fifties. I got an unexpected bonus when her husband, Dionysis, narrated an account of his experiences in the town of Lixouri during the week of the disaster. Fourteen-year-old Dionysis Synodinos-Vallianos had been sleeping in his tree house on the morning of Sunday, August 9 when a 6.4 quake struck. His memories of that event inspired my Tree House chapter with the Katros and Matsakis children. At the time of the “Big One”, Dion was in the fields with his parents, picking grapes, while the younger children played in a pear tree. This description, of a rural scene, formed my own picture of the fictional Katros smallholding. Dionysis was struggling with health issues in the year I finished the first draft. It took me another eight or nine months of edits before I mailed out copies for my beta readers. I sent the manuscript to Eleni and received a reply a few months later. While I was delighted to hear that I’d captured the essence of the island, I was sad to learn that Dionysis had passed away; Eleni told me he’d been looking forward to reading my book. Born in the US, Eleni (Elaine) has lived in Kefalonia for more than thirty years. Quite by chance, the main female character in MAGIC is an American named Elena. The fictional Elena struggles with the decision to leave the US...

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Where Have All The Songbirds Gone?

Where Have All The Songbirds Gone?

By on Apr 11, 2011 in Blog | 0 comments

Where have all the songbirds gone? Scientists at the University of Sheffield, England, say the din of lawn mowers, leaf blowers and other machines could be the cause. Maybe leaf blowers will eventually make writers extinct too. Remember the halcyon days when sitting in the garden listening to the birdsong was a joyful pastime. Well, today, maybe less so. It seems like there’s never a time when gardening crews aren’t within earshot. Perhaps, we can come up with a mobile app coordinating their visits, then we could have leaf blower Monday’s on Mayfield Avenue or Strimmer Tuesday’s on Montana; the rest of the week could be reserved for silence. A funny thing happened on the way to finishing my novel. At some point, leaf blowers morphed from thought-killer to wellspring of inspiration. Succumbing to writer’s block wasn’t an option, neither was cutting off an ear like Van Gogh, but who would have thought noise could bring a revelation. No longer was silence necessary to complete that tricky paragraph, on the contrary, the leaf blower became indispensable and the muse for my best work. When dread silence descended, I’d whip out a headset and my pre-recorded leaf blower MP3s and press on. This certainly helped, but it just wasn’t the same without the dust and exhaust fumes pouring in through my open windows. To make matters worse, my building doesn’t use any power garden tools. I offered to buy the yard guy a leaf blower, even thought of hiring my own man to stand outside my window blowing imaginary leaves into the street but the building manager wouldn’t hear of it. Back to the birds. As soon as the leaf blowing stops, the crows in the tree outside squawk and squabble. I’m not sure if they’re cheering or pleading for the leaf blower’s return, maybe it’s the only chance they get to talk to each other. The City of Los Angeles banned leaf blowers as long ago as the last century, but thanks to courageous gardeners, defying the law, risking their freedom to operate their HARLEY DAVIDSON-LOUD gizmos, writers and telecommuters needn’t fear peace and quiet. Who needs the songbirds, we can’t hear them anyway. Inspired by an article in...

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Freaky Coincidence with Japan Earthquake

Freaky Coincidence with Japan Earthquake

By on Mar 27, 2011 in Blog | 1 comment

Let me confess, I’m a Japanophile. The culture, people, food, countryside, there’s not much I don’t like. I own over a hundred Japanese movies, have read most of their great 20th century authors, even tried learning the language but I’m not there yet. I’ve found that the Japanese show a keen interest in how they are perceived in the west. I had some vague hope that I might get my novel translated into Japanese and market it as a western author influenced by Japanese literature; sort of a Japanese-Western hybrid. My novel’s not about Japan, I’ll save that for another book, but there are earthquakes, three of them to be exact; the earthquakes that destroyed the Greek island of Kefalonia in 1953. Within hours of finishing the book – I can’t be sure how close – probably within three, a 9.0 earthquake hit Japan. I started writing the novel back in March 2010, finished the first draft in July and went through edit after edit until I declared it finished on the evening of March 10, 2011 PST. I know this because I save each day’s work as a new file with the date included in the filename. The next morning, I uploaded the files to lulu.com and ordered ten printed copies. At some time between finishing the story on Thursday night and sending it for print on Friday morning, the Sendai earthquake happened. I emailed some friends in Tokyo to check on their safety – yes, they were all OK. Normally I might have said “Guess what! I just finished a novel” but I couldn’t. Who, from Japan, would want to visit my web site and see Chapter 2 of the story is an account of a devastating earthquake. One friend in particular has often recommended books to me. I’ll have to wait a while longer before mentioning mine. Here’s a story from a few years back. I was in a hotel at Kyoto station; it was around 11:00pm. My colleague and I had just got back from a hectic day of customer visits. He turned in but I went to the hotel bar for a snack and a nightcap. The bar was almost empty; I sat at...

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